CVHR Meeting (Nov 6): An Enslaved Woman and her Dressmaker Daughter

Noted author and textile scholar Kathleen Curtis Wilson* will share with us new and important information about cloth and clothing production by an African American woman.  Nineteenth-century textiles with an African American provenance are rare nationwide and unheard of in Appalachia.

Thus the discovery of two quilts and other items made in Bath County, Virginia, by the daughter of an enslaved woman was “extraordinary,” Wilson says.  She will tell the story of Elizabeth Morris Bolden (1872-1948), a highly-skilled seamstress who lived in Warm Springs all her life and was married to Charles Bolden (1856-1919) of Charlottesville.

Lizzie Bolden’s great-granddaughter, Perlista Henry, who preserved the textiles and family stories and photographs, will join us for this exciting presentation.

*Wilson’s books include Irish People, Irish Linen and Uplifting the South, the biography of Mary Mildred Sullivan, who among other things was active in the Southern Industrial Education Association.

 

** The African American Heritage Center is located in the Jefferson School City Center in Charlottesville, 233 Fourth St. NW.  There is plenty of parking.  It is on the second floor at the south end of the building. We meet at 4pm.

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