Archive for the ‘Albemarle’ Category

CVHR Meeting (May 3, 2018): A New Chapter for the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society (ACHS)

Monday, April 16th, 2018

Coy Barefoot, ACHS Executive Director, will join us to exchange ideas about the Society’s future.  He will share his short- and long-term visions and seek our views on ways CVHR and ACHS can collaborate on future projects and programs.

CVHR Meeting (March 1, 2018): The Art and Mysterie of Colonial Apprenticeships

Tuesday, March 27th, 2018

Bob Vernon unraveled the “art and mysterie” of colonial legal processes with a Power Point presentation revealing how the courts of Albemarle and adjacent counties managed juvenile apprenticeships.  Children of color were bound to white masters and lived in their families, a contractual relationship overseen by the white Overseers of the Poor.  Apprenticeship records are thus a key source for understanding the lives of free blacks and the changing relations between black and white Virginians in the eighteenth century.

You can see Bob’s PPT program for yourself at
http://people.virginia.edu/~rwv6ad/fpc/The%20Art%20and%20Mysterie%20of%20Colonial%20Apprenticeships.pps

CVHR Meeting (January 4, 2018): Creating a Historical Map of Albemarle County

Tuesday, March 27th, 2018

Erik Irtenkauf has offered to generate an interactive historical web map of Albemarle County to include sites reflecting the research of CVHR members.  He anchored a lively discussion that ranged far beyond merely adding locations, events, and people to the map.  We explored what the scope and methodology of such a project might be and acknowledged the need to be compatible with similar projects in the state (Preservation Virginia is developing a Historic African American Schools Survey in ArcGIS and the Louisa County Historical Society has a mapping project to locate slaves in 1860, among other things ).

Further discussion will be ongoing.  Comments and/or questions are welcome.

 

CVHR Meeting (December 7, 2017): Telling the Ivy Creek Story with Story Maps

Tuesday, March 13th, 2018

Story maps are web pages that blend interactive maps with photos and text.  Erik Irtenkauf demonstrated his story map of the history of the Ivy Creek Natural Area.  Digital maps and aerial photographs, supplemented by explanatory text and historical documents, show how freed slave Hugh Carr gradually acquired the acreage that became River View Farm and passed it on to his children.  Erik is expanding the story to include the post-Civil War African American community of Hydraulic Mills-Union Ridge.  And a time slider will soon make the depiction of change over time even easier to access.  You can see the Ivy Creek story map at https://ivycreek.maps.arcgis.com/home/index.html.  Erik will present “Albemarle’s History Story Mapping” at the Ivy Creek Natural Area on Sunday, April 8th at 2 PM.

CVHR Meeting (October 5, 2017): The 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic in Charlottesville and Albemarle County

Tuesday, March 13th, 2018

Addeane Caelleigh evoked the terrifying months of late 1918 and early 1919, when the “Spanish influenza” came to central Virginia.  After providing a global and national context for the worst epidemic in history (700,000 deaths in the US), she told us what death certificates and other records reveal about the situation in Charlottesville and Albemarle County: 227 documented deaths (probably only half the actual figure), the role of local doctors and nurses, the actions of volunteers in making soup and stitching flu masks, and more.   See Addeane’s article on this topic, complete with lists of physicians, nurses, and flu victims, in the Magazine of Albemarle County History, volume 75 (2017), pp. 31-87.

CVHR Meeting (June 1, 2017): Round Table

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

Garland and Mary Beth Dalton spoke about their search for Garland’s ancestors in the mixed-race Gibson’s Mill community of Louisa County.   Bob Vernon showed us the scope of his project to scan or photograph public records (including deeds, wills, tax lists, marriage records, order books, overseers of the poor records), mostly from Albemarle County from the 18th to the 20th century.   Jane Smith told of her research on Rebecca Farrar Cogbill, which placed her in a community of free blacks (including Kitty Foster and the extended Battles family) in the heart of the Ragged Mountains in 1850.

CVHR Meeting (April 6, 2017): Waterworks: A History of the Local Water Supply, 1819–2017

Friday, March 17th, 2017

Steve Thompson, Cinder Stanton, and Dede Smith told the story of Charlottesville’s public water supply, 1819-2017, from three different perspectives.  Steve focused on the various schemes for bringing water to the University of Virginia, from its founding to its collaborative venture with Charlottesville in the 1880s.  Cinder provided some background on owners of the land that is now the Ragged Mountain Natural Area—particularly the Mayo and Houchens families, whose land was taken by eminent domain from 1885 to 1910 by the town (later city) of Charlottesville.  Dede chronicled the problematic evolution of the municipal water system since the first Ragged Mountain Reservoir in 1885 to the present, illuminating issues of water quality, watershed protection, and local government authority that have affected decisions about reservoir locations and management for over a century.

 

 

CVHR Meeting (March 2, 2017): Discovering the Albemarle County Origins of the U.S.C.T.

Saturday, February 18th, 2017

William Kurtz, digital historian at the Nau Center for Civil War History at UVA, brought us up-to-date on projects at the Center, with a special focus on its Black Virginians in Blue project.  He explained how—building on the work of Ervin Jordan—the project has found more than two hundred Union soldiers born in Albemarle County who served in the United States Colored Troops (USCT) during the war.

For Will’s account of research methods used in the search and for Elizabeth Varon’s posts about the men, formerly enslaved in Albemarle County, who served in Missouri regiments, see http://naucenter.as.virginia.edu/blog-articles.

If you know of a USCT soldier who lived in Albemarle before the war, let Will know (wbk2e@virginia.edu).  For a description of the Nau Center’s digital projects, see http://naucenter.as.virginia.edu/digital-projects.

CHVR Meeting (Dec. 1): Murder, Moonshine, and Misconceptions: The People of the Ragged Mountains

Saturday, November 19th, 2016

Cinder Stanton shared some preliminary findings about the lives of the poor residents of the Ragged Mountains in the 19th and 20th centuries, in particular the eastern section along Route 29 South and the Charlottesville to Lynchburg railroad.  What were the people described by everyone from Edgar Allan Poe to a UVA committee a century later as “savage,” “primitive,” “degraded,” and “degenerate” really like?  Topics covered included historical (and stereotypical) descriptions of the population, the legend of their possible Hessian origin, the importance of the railroad, the missionary role of UVA and the Episcopal church, the eugenics movement, the scarcity of educational opportunites, sassafras mills, and stories of some individual residents.

 

 

CVHR Meeting (Nov. 3): Using GIS and Mapping to Explore Albemarle County History

Thursday, October 27th, 2016

Erik Irtenkauf, professional GIS analyst and history enthusiast, showed us the exciting results of using a Geographical Data System (GIS) and web mapping to enhance our understanding of local history.  He displayed his interactive maps of historic sites in Albemarle County and of migration routes taken by families leaving the county (using, for starters, the lists of emigrants in Edgar Woods, Albemarle County in Virginia, 1901).  Erik’s “story map” of the history of Hollymead and Forest Lakes combines a trove of documentary information with a rich assortment of maps and images.

If you missed the program, you can go to: http://www.albemarlehistorymapping.com