Archive for the ‘Children’ Category

CVHR Meeting (March 1, 2018): The Art and Mysterie of Colonial Apprenticeships

Tuesday, March 27th, 2018

Bob Vernon unraveled the “art and mysterie” of colonial legal processes with a Power Point presentation revealing how the courts of Albemarle and adjacent counties managed juvenile apprenticeships.  Children of color were bound to white masters and lived in their families, a contractual relationship overseen by the white Overseers of the Poor.  Apprenticeship records are thus a key source for understanding the lives of free blacks and the changing relations between black and white Virginians in the eighteenth century.

You can see Bob’s PPT program for yourself at
http://people.virginia.edu/~rwv6ad/fpc/The%20Art%20and%20Mysterie%20of%20Colonial%20Apprenticeships.pps

CVHR Meeting (February 1, 2018): Beating the Odds: Janie Porter Barrett Day Nursery to Barrett Early Learning Center: 1935-2018

Tuesday, March 27th, 2018

Dede Smith told us about the founding, in 1935, and early years of the Janie Porter Barrett Day Nursery, an important resource for working African American women in Charlottesville.  She showed how it prevailed through funding and location challenges and drew the support of a cross-section of the black and white community, highlighting the roles of founder Daisy Green as well as local leaders like Otelia Jackson and Virginia Edwards.

You can watch a 15-minute video produced in 2016 to celebrate Barrett’s 80th anniversary:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEFaJF0Cn3U&t=117s

CVHR Meeting (Feb. 2, 2017): From Mary Booth to Virginia Christian: Child Incarceration and the Making of the New South 

Saturday, February 18th, 2017

Catherine Jones, professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and a 2016-2017 fellow at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, is exploring the development of Virginia’s juvenile justice system in the four decades after the Civil War, when two thousand children under 18 were incarcerated in the Penitentiary.  While focusing on the 1882 case of Mary Booth, a fourteen-year-old African American sentenced to death for poisoning her employer, she illuminated conditions in the Penitentiary, the perils of convict leasing, attitudes to childhood and race, the fitful rise of penal reform, and the shifting relationship between punishment and protection.

Catherine is the author of Intimate Reconstructions: Children in Postemancipation Virginia (2015).