Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

CVHR Meeting (Sep. 7, 2017): Topic TBA

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

CVHR Meeting (May 4, 2017): Researching Montpelier’s Enslaved Community

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

Elizabeth Ladner, Director of Research at Montpelier, reviewed the evolution of research relating to the large enslaved population that supported the Madison family, including the stories of a number of enslaved individuals.  She also provided a sneak peek at Montpelier’s upcoming exhibit, “The Mere Distinction of Colour.”

CVHR Meeting (March 2, 2017): Discovering the Albemarle County Origins of the U.S.C.T.

Saturday, February 18th, 2017

William Kurtz, digital historian at the Nau Center for Civil War History at UVA, brought us up-to-date on projects at the Center, with a special focus on its Black Virginians in Blue project.  He explained how—building on the work of Ervin Jordan—the project has found more than two hundred Union soldiers born in Albemarle County who served in the United States Colored Troops (USCT) during the war.

For Will’s account of research methods used in the search and for Elizabeth Varon’s posts about the men, formerly enslaved in Albemarle County, who served in Missouri regiments, see http://naucenter.as.virginia.edu/blog-articles.

If you know of a USCT soldier who lived in Albemarle before the war, let Will know (wbk2e@virginia.edu).  For a description of the Nau Center’s digital projects, see http://naucenter.as.virginia.edu/digital-projects.

CVHR Meeting (Feb. 2, 2017): From Mary Booth to Virginia Christian: Child Incarceration and the Making of the New South 

Saturday, February 18th, 2017

Catherine Jones, professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and a 2016-2017 fellow at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, is exploring the development of Virginia’s juvenile justice system in the four decades after the Civil War, when two thousand children under 18 were incarcerated in the Penitentiary.  While focusing on the 1882 case of Mary Booth, a fourteen-year-old African American sentenced to death for poisoning her employer, she illuminated conditions in the Penitentiary, the perils of convict leasing, attitudes to childhood and race, the fitful rise of penal reform, and the shifting relationship between punishment and protection.

Catherine is the author of Intimate Reconstructions: Children in Postemancipation Virginia (2015).

 

CVHR Meeting (Jan. 5, 2017): Two presentations on 18th century freedom suits and 20th century photography

Wednesday, December 14th, 2016

The Fragility of Freedom: Kinney Family Freedom Suits in Virginia and Missouri

Bob Vernon told the story of the Kinney family and their struggles for freedom over two centuries and two continents.  In an experiment on behalf of finding the best methods to put CVHR-type talks online, he devised a way to let us listen to rather than read relevant legal documents (the voice was a Siri female).  One especially colorful example of the persistent re-enslavement of free people of color was Thornton Kinney, whose travels took him to Missouri, Liberia, and a rowdy San Francisco.

Hopes and Dreams in the Albert Durant Photography Collection of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Amy Speckart previewed a presentation she will give at the Virginia Forum in March on a collection of thousands of images by an African American photographer, acquired by Colonial Williamsburg in the 1990s.  Albert Durant (1920-1991) photographed everyday events in a segregated Williamsburg from the 1930s to the 1950s.  Amy explored his life, his photographs, and the implications of their acquisition by an institution with a history of exclusion.

 

CVHR Meeting (August): No August meeting

Sunday, August 28th, 2016

CVHR Meeting (July 7): Summer Insights

Sunday, August 28th, 2016

This meeting was lightly attended, but we had a good discussion, mostly about the CVHR web presence and how to improve it.  We need a “vision” for the website (and thus an estimate of cost) before we can seek funding sources.  In the meantime, some of us are working on ways to bring the website up to date in the short term.  All ideas are welcome. 

CVHR Monthly Meeting (July): Share Your Thoughts and Discoveries: a Roundtable Discussion

Sunday, December 7th, 2014

This is an open meeting (July 10, 2014), with no speaker.  If you have a topic you want to put on the agenda for discussion, let me know before the meeting.  Also, this is an opportunity for short reports (5 minutes or so) on discoveries you have made, research avenues you’re pursuing, things you want to share.  This also provides a chance for you to ask questions that regular meetings didn’t allow for.

I’d like us to discuss how CVHR can best participate in the several Albemarle County projects that intersect with our activities, like the African American Heritage Trail, the post-Bypass interpretive plan for Hydraulic-Union Ridge, and current initiatives of the Parks department.  Other topics include: ideas for future speakers; strategies forCVHR’s future, including website and database; and new ways to share what we have learned.

CVHR Meeting (Oct. 3): Gleanings from the Union Ridge Research (at KENWOOD)

Monday, September 30th, 2013

After all the attention focused on the Sammons cemetery and homestead, we thought it would be a good idea to feature some of Jesse Sammons’s neighbors in the Hydraulic-Union Ridge-Cartersburg area.  Cinder Stanton and Alice Cannon will report on preliminary findings about some of the people of the community—their locations in slavery, their post-Civil War land acquisition, their brushes with the law, and their experiences trying to stem the tide of Jim Crow.  Gayle Schulman will introduce a new project related to the Civil War.  And we hope to have some discussion of ways to make CVHR research accessible.

 

4pm – Thursday, October 3 at Kenwood / The Jefferson Library

**The Jefferson Library is located on Route 53, almost half a mile past the Monticello entrance, if you’re coming from Charlottesville. Turn right at the white gateposts (an oval sign mentions Kenwood and the Jefferson Library). Park in the first lots you come to and walk uphill to the Library, the large building at the top of the circle.

CVHR Meeting (April 4): Bleak House Biographies

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

Alice Cannon will talk about what she learned as she followed the paths after Emancipation of all the people who were enslaved at Bleak House, the James B. Rogers plantation near Earlysville: where they went, how they supported each other, what they and their children went on to do. She will particularly focus on the story of the Woodfolk and Whipps families and the Evans family: who stayed, who left, and how did they remained connected?

Kenwood Library, Monticello

4pm, the first Thursday of most months.