CVHR Meeting (Dec. 4): CVHR Celebrates 2014!

December 7th, 2014

Conversation and refreshments instead of speakers and agenda.  We’ll get together and  review the year and look ahead to 2015.

** The African American Heritage Center is located in the Jefferson School City Center in Charlottesville, 233 Fourth St. NW.  There is plenty of parking.  It is on the second floor at the south end of the building. We meet at 4pm.

CVHR Meeting (Nov 6): An Enslaved Woman and her Dressmaker Daughter

December 7th, 2014

Noted author and textile scholar Kathleen Curtis Wilson* will share with us new and important information about cloth and clothing production by an African American woman.  Nineteenth-century textiles with an African American provenance are rare nationwide and unheard of in Appalachia.

Thus the discovery of two quilts and other items made in Bath County, Virginia, by the daughter of an enslaved woman was “extraordinary,” Wilson says.  She will tell the story of Elizabeth Morris Bolden (1872-1948), a highly-skilled seamstress who lived in Warm Springs all her life and was married to Charles Bolden (1856-1919) of Charlottesville.

Lizzie Bolden’s great-granddaughter, Perlista Henry, who preserved the textiles and family stories and photographs, will join us for this exciting presentation.

*Wilson’s books include Irish People, Irish Linen and Uplifting the South, the biography of Mary Mildred Sullivan, who among other things was active in the Southern Industrial Education Association.

 

** The African American Heritage Center is located in the Jefferson School City Center in Charlottesville, 233 Fourth St. NW.  There is plenty of parking.  It is on the second floor at the south end of the building. We meet at 4pm.

CVHR Meeting (Oct 2): Share your Research

December 7th, 2014

Come tell us what you did on your summer vacation, i.e. your latest research discoveries and questions.  Help decide what’s most important to say in the African American Heritage Trail brochure—draft texts are nearly complete and we’ll share some of them with you.

 

** The African American Heritage Center is located in the Jefferson School City Center in Charlottesville, 233 Fourth St. NW.  There is plenty of parking.  It is on the second floor at the south end of the building. We meet at 4pm.

CVHR Meeting (Sept 11): Looking Fowards and Backwards

December 7th, 2014

Philip Cobbs and Sam Towler will take us northeast to Barboursville and west to Afton Mountain.  Philip will give us a look at the Cobbs family of Barboursville, which he calls a journey from Echo Valley to entitlement. Sam will present his research on the now-vanished community called New York at the foot of Afton Mountain in Albemarle County.  Founded by Sam’s ancestor, James Hays, in 1799, it existed as a town until about 1856.  He will also cover neighboring farms around New York and provide information on the African Americans at the Brooksville, Crobarger, and the Cedars farms in Greenwood.

** The African American Heritage Center is located in the Jefferson School City Center in Charlottesville, 233 Fourth St. NW.  There is plenty of parking.  It is on the second floor at the south end of the building. We meet at 4pm.

 

CVHR Monthly Meeting (July): Share Your Thoughts and Discoveries: a Roundtable Discussion

December 7th, 2014

This is an open meeting (July 10, 2014), with no speaker.  If you have a topic you want to put on the agenda for discussion, let me know before the meeting.  Also, this is an opportunity for short reports (5 minutes or so) on discoveries you have made, research avenues you’re pursuing, things you want to share.  This also provides a chance for you to ask questions that regular meetings didn’t allow for.

I’d like us to discuss how CVHR can best participate in the several Albemarle County projects that intersect with our activities, like the African American Heritage Trail, the post-Bypass interpretive plan for Hydraulic-Union Ridge, and current initiatives of the Parks department.  Other topics include: ideas for future speakers; strategies forCVHR’s future, including website and database; and new ways to share what we have learned.

CVHR Monthly Meeting (June 5th)

June 2nd, 2014

Topic: “From These Beginnings”: A Tribute to My Grandmother Sallie Elizabeth Johnson

Gloria Gilmore will show us a rich collection of family photographs as she speaks of her quest to understand her grandmother’s life and family.  Here she sets the stage for us:

A mother’s death just after emancipation separates her children to different regions—Sallie to Virginia and her two siblings to New Jersey.  What happened to Sallie?  What do we know about her education and marriage, and the family’s effort to raise and educate their family, establish a homestead, maintain the oral history, and instill faith and love for family and future generations?

 

** The African American Heritage Center is located in the Jefferson School City Center in Charlottesville, 233 Fourth St. NW.  There is plenty of parking.  It is on the second floor at the south end of the building.

CVHR monthly meeting (May 1): Oral History & Jefferson Descendant

April 28th, 2014

Topic: Finding Eva Robinson Taylor: How African-American Oral Tradition Plus Documents and Modern Science Revealed a Formerly Unknown Kinship to Thomas Jefferson and His Extended Family

For more than 40 years, Gayle Jessup White pursued an oral history, a mere thread of a story claiming that her family is directly descended from Thomas Jefferson. With little evidence supporting the lineage, Gayle assumed she was related to Jefferson and his slave Sally Hemings. Now, she’s discovered a surprising truth: she is indeed a Jefferson descendant, but not a Hemings. What she has uncovered may change the way historians and history lovers view Jefferson and his extended clan.

** The African American Heritage Center (AAHC) is located in the Jefferson School City Center in Charlottesville, 233 Fourth St. NW.  There is plenty of parking.  The AAHC is on the second floor at the south end of the building.

CVHR monthly meeting (April 3rd)

March 31st, 2014

Hidden in Plain Site

Antoinette W. Roades will present research that revealed a forgotten plantation established in the mid-18th century on more than a thousand acres lying on both sides of what is now Route 29′s busiest stretch. She will focus on the area that was between the Union Ridge and Free State communities, just inside the horseshoe formed by Rio and Hydraulic roads  – aka the upper arc of the county courthouse-anchored Nine Mile Circle — and will offer sketches of owners including Carrs, Raileys, and Nuttycombes.

Location: The African American Heritage Center (AAHC) is located in the Jefferson School City Center in Charlottesville, 233 Fourth St. NW.  There is plenty of parking.  The AAHC is on the second floor at the south end of the building.

CVHR monthly meeting (Nov 7): Blue Ridge Tunnel

October 16th, 2013

Mary Lyons and Paul Collinge will tell us how Irish miners, African Americans, and a French engineer built the longest mountain railroad tunnel in the world.  The Blue Ridge Railroad-Virginia Central Railroad project was built by Irish famine immigrants and enslaved men between 1850 and 1860.  They will show portions of Mary’s digital book Dark Passage: The Virginia Blue Ridge Tunnel and Mary will explain her recent discoveries about slave labor on the Albemarle County section of this massive public works enterprise.

This meeting will be held back at the Jefferson School!

CVHR Meeting (Oct. 3): Gleanings from the Union Ridge Research (at KENWOOD)

September 30th, 2013

After all the attention focused on the Sammons cemetery and homestead, we thought it would be a good idea to feature some of Jesse Sammons’s neighbors in the Hydraulic-Union Ridge-Cartersburg area.  Cinder Stanton and Alice Cannon will report on preliminary findings about some of the people of the community—their locations in slavery, their post-Civil War land acquisition, their brushes with the law, and their experiences trying to stem the tide of Jim Crow.  Gayle Schulman will introduce a new project related to the Civil War.  And we hope to have some discussion of ways to make CVHR research accessible.

 

4pm – Thursday, October 3 at Kenwood / The Jefferson Library

**The Jefferson Library is located on Route 53, almost half a mile past the Monticello entrance, if you’re coming from Charlottesville. Turn right at the white gateposts (an oval sign mentions Kenwood and the Jefferson Library). Park in the first lots you come to and walk uphill to the Library, the large building at the top of the circle.